Tag: social skills

Debunking Autism Stereotypes And Remembering Your Exceptional Child’s Individuality

Seven years ago when I knew something was different about Michael, I started reading up on various childhood developmental issues. At the top of the list for the criteria Michael met, was autism. Many of the articles pin pointed a lot of the idiosyncrasies of autism that are so true- difficulty with speech, difficulty with sitting still or not having energy to move, seeming difficulty with hearing. But another point I kept seeing in article after article, not being social or wanting to be around other people, turned out, in my autistic son’s case to be the complete opposite. Yes, you heard me. From birth, Michael was social and wanted to interact. The thing is, he did not know how to interact with other children and adults. Even with Dad and I there were challenges, first because of communication issues and language delays. Then, he was one of the lucky kids who caught up with language and then some, but had to learn (and is still learning) how to have a conversation, such as the give and take, asking the right questions, and finishing the encounter appropriately.

But the thing is, when I was told Michael had autism, I kept remembering all the warnings about the child not wanting to be social. It upset me somehow, more than the other so called defects, which by the way, are not always so. Yes, autism is a challenging condition for people who have it in the world they live in.  The world can be hard on individuals who have sensitive hearing, touch, sight and bodies that feel the environment in a different way. Yes, it is hard to make themselves understood and heard, and for parents and other neuro typical people who want to understand and follow everything this is hard too, but saying that someone does not want to do something is not the same as saying they do, just it is hard or that, hey, they’ll find their own way to do it in time. It struck me tonight as I was preparing dinner, how social my autistic kid is. He calls many of his friends on the phone each night and has, wait for it, real conversations with them. The conversations started out more rudimentary and basic at first, and yes they sometimes watch videos over the phone, but more often than not, Michael and his autistic friends have REAL conversations about REAL feelings, their days, and getting together.  Wait for it. They talk about girls now too that they are in puberty. This was not the picture I’d had of autism, and I’m so glad that Michael is turning that notion upside down. But then, he has always amazed us with surpassing what people thought he would do. My friends have had the same experiences with their children. No autistic child is the same and they will all amaze us if we give them the chance and not box them in.

The good thing is that today experts are admitting that as much as they know about autism, there is so much else they still have to learn. And you know what parents, the best ones to learn it from are our autistic kids and adults. They are all so different and their challenges are different. Talk to them. Read their blogs. Have them come to your schools. It  is so important to keep an open mind always about your child. Tell them as I tell Michael, all about the great things they will do, just like that Dr. Zeus book talks about. If kids believe in themselves, they will go above and beyond. Yes, it may take some kids more years than others to get where they are comfortable, but make no bets that they won’t get there.  It’s one day at a time, loving them for who they are and what they are passionate about, and never never putting your child (exceptional or otherwise) in someone else’s box.  They will do what they were sent here to do.

Exceptional Parents, were you ever told something about your Exceptional Children that would never happen and now has? How did it make you feel? Did you believe it or say HELL NO! I hope it was the latter. If not, don’t despair. It’s never too late to go with your child’s flow keeping in mind their limitations of course. The thing is, never let the limitations define the whole person your child is. You have your limitations but it doesn’t stop you. It is the same with your child. Remember them that their brain is amazing, that the way they see the world is amazing. This is easier on some days than others, of course. But never never stop believing in your child’s magic, and you’ll see them surprise you with the butterfly they are becoming. Until next time.

Are you the parent of an Exceptional Child struggling with how best to handle challenging behavior? Are you worried about development, anxiety, or doubting your abilities to help your child become the best they can be? I can help you find your confidence as a parent again. For more information about my journey and coaching programs, check out my website: http://www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com. Let me help personalize tools that will help your Exceptional family thrive! 

Birthday Parties And Understanding of Friendships

I was so proud of Michael this weekend. He blew me away with everything he seemed to be able to handle effortlessly. He wrote in beautiful handwriting in his friend’s birthday card, did amazing with sitting on Santa’s lap at the mall, and then handled losing his tooth and going to see the “Santa Train” all without losing his composure and remaining calm. As it was  a swim party I saw how well he has improved with swimming too. He knows how to do the front crawl. But the best part for me, was how proud of himself he was. The awareness of his strengths is increasing. The awareness of his weaknesses are too, but he is learning strategies to handle that as well.

I am seeing my little guy growing up. He is choosing which people he wants to be friends with. Along with that, comes a lot of responsibility in learning to be polite about who you want to play with and invite. This is something Dad and I are working with him on too, as it is one of those abstract things that is hard for him to decipher. There are also some friends he has “outgrown,” and again we are reminding him to be polite and kind. You don’t need to be best friends with everyone, but all people deserve self-respect just as you do. I found myself close to happy tears watching him show me what he can do, what he understands, and how he is starting to learn how to have back and forth conversations with kids his own age and adults. This is also beautiful to see and I am so glad he is able to understand this.

There are, of course,  days that are very tough and challenging. He will take away the lesson from it though, which is amazing. Before, it would have fallen on deaf ears. He was not able to understand the lesson. And even when we have to teach it a few times, if Dad and I are calm, he will grasp it. That is another important thing for caregivers to remember. Every child is different and will develop differently, including on the autism spectrum. Parents need to remember that too and cut themselves and their kids some slack.

Exceptional Parents, what memorable things have your Exceptional Children done lately? When do you see they are at their best and what is the most efficient way to motivate them? Maturity will happen as they grow, and it is important we grow with them too. Parents need to stay calm, focused and positive, while they encourage their child to do the same thing. Until next time.

Stressed out with the approaching holiday season? Download my FREE EBOOK: “5 WAYS TO HANDLE EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY ANXIETY” http://www.exceptionalparenting.net/EBOOKS

 

 

 

4 Tips to Handle Exceptional Mommy Meltdowns

I am not proud of the way I have been handling Michael’s stress lately. In part, in large part, it has been because I have not been taking the best care of myself. I have not been sleeping, exercising and eating the way I want to. I have done my best to be present for him, but when I am not at my best physically, mentally and spiritually it is hard.

Our kids are treasures. Michael is not exception to this rule. He teaches me lessons every day about life, love, respect, faith and what really, I mean really matters. But it doesn’t make it easy. For either of us. He doesn’t always understand that Mom needs time alone. Away from him? With her writing? A blog? A friend’s book launch?  A writer’s meeting? Her business? What is this? Then, just as soon as the anger flares up, it is gone. I feel like a failure when I yell, though I know what to tell other parents about patience. It is hard to practice it myself. Still, I do tell Michael that Mom needs to work better on using her strategies to handle anger. It is fine to be angry, but we can’t let it rule us.

Michael is very forgiving. We always make up before bedtime even when we have fights at bedtime. But I hate Mommy Meltdowns. I try to avoid them whenever I can. Still, sometimes in spite of my best intentions, they happen. So here are some tips for other Moms to handle their Mommy meltdowns better:

Tips to Help with Mommy Meltdowns:

  1. Am I sleeping enough? What is happening to cause your sleep to be interrupted? Are you not delegating things so as to alleviate stress? Are you not exercising? Are you not communicating to those around you about your problems? These can all trigger stressful episodes that get worse without you being pro-active.
  2. Are you not making time for 5-10 min of “Me Time” a day: This is especially hard if you have more than one child and/or if you are a single parent. But it is essential. I have one child and a partner, and still there have been times when I tend to get overwhelmed. Take the time for you. You, you partner and/or kids will thank you.
  3. Don’t be overly strict: Yep. As I write these words now, I know this is what I am striving for, yet I still have days and weeks when I fail to practice this. Why? Because it is easy to fall back on what we learned as children. The same strategies do not work for a child with autism. I sometimes need to be reminded of that. If you forget, don’t worry. Just remember for the next time.
  4. Reach out to other parents of exceptional children: I guarantee you. Whatever story you tell to your community of how you badly handled a situation with your child with autism, they will still support you and commiserate. I have been in both positions with my Mom friends, confessing and supporting.My parent community has always rallied  around me (as I did to them), and told me that my child and I are amazing and doing the best we both can. And we are and do!

 

Exceptional Parents, do you have Mommy and Daddy meltdowns with your Exceptional Child/dren? It’s alright. We all do, just as they do with us. We are human, and even if we know better, parenting and being a child is hard work. Forgive yourself, forgive your child, and learn from your mistakes. Don’t be afraid to try new things for you and your child either that will break the dynamic of tension. You will be amazed by the results. Until next time.

 

Feeling stressed about special needs parenting? You are not alone. Download my FREE EBOOK on “5 WAYS TO MANAGE EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY ANXIETY” here: http://www.exceptionalparenting.site88.net. 

Negative Forecasting And How To Help My Son Over It

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No matter how many skills Michael continues to learn and the intelligence he display daily, there is something he still struggles with and I know will for years to come, anxiety and worrying about the future in the shape of negative forecasting. He comes from a whole long line of us worriers in the family, and as a child and adult who was a huge worrier and is slowly learning coping mechanisms, I feel his pain. As frustrating as it is as a parent when I am trying to make him see to take it one day at a time and he is worrying about one month from now or six, I know what he is feeling as the insecure child. In addition, I am noticing all kinds of tics or OCD type behavior when he is feeling most stressed. He will walk over certain parts of the pavement if he feels he didn’t do something right on our walk, he will tap a wall or light walking passed it. I know these are probably OCD tics, so staying calm and reminding him to relax takes on a whole new level than my Mom had to do with me when all I had was the negative forecasting. We were told by a doctor that medication for the anxiety and obsessions would not be a good idea as it would make some of the other traits of his autism worse. At any rate, we don’t want him taking medication unless there is no other choice. First we plan on exploring many other avenues to help Michael learn to control his anxiety, such as CBT (Cognitive Behavior Therapy). The school psychologist will be working with him on a weekly basis to help with showing him ways he can relax and handle stress and anxiety.

So how do I help Michael with his negative forecasting? Well, other than the counselling he will be receiving at school again this year, I use tools the Psycho Educator from our community advised last year. These don’t work all the time, but I’m hoping with practice he will learn to walk and move when he is stressed, find a quiet place to cry or get his emotions out, and learn how to talk more about his feelings to me or someone also he trusts so they don’t overpower him. I also have found great tools on sites like Pinterest which have pictograms depicting emotions. I have them up on the fridge for Michael to refer to when he is stressed, and help him learn to express himself easier. He is starting to use these tools.

Exceptional Parents, what has worked for you and your child when handling anxiety and negative forecasting? What kind of tools do you use and what has been recommended to you? All of our children are different, so of course there is no “one size fits all” solution. As with all else, the best thing to do is to look at the problem from your child’s level of understanding and try out different techniques with them to see what works. Above all, having patience and staying calm is the best you can do for both of you as they will learn patience with themselves too. Until next time.

Feeling stressed about special needs parenting? You are not alone. Download my FREE EBOOK on “5 WAYS TO MANAGE EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY ANXIETY” here: http://www.exceptionalparenting.site88.net. 

Patience Is The Key: How To Dig Deep Down In Your Parent Arsenal

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Patience is a virtue. Once you become a parent, you really realize how you have to ooze patience. You have to live it, breathe it, and practice it. Things don’t always go according to plan. For Michael’s Dad and I, as I’ve said many times in this blog, he has taken us down a path that is not one we thought we’d be on. At times it is brutal. At times it is beautiful. At times, it is spiritual. Michael too is learning from us, good and bad, though lately more good, I hope how to be patient and calm. This is something hard for the adults around him.

So where does this leave most parents, stressed with jobs, housework, family responsibility and personal space? It’s hard. I know it is even tougher for single parents out there. They must shoulder having patience for the child, themselves and life stresses all on their own. I take my hat off to them. It is hard enough to parent with a partner, especially as sometimes you can’t talk to each other due to time constraints (Dad and I), or work responsibilities, but sometimes you clash on perspectives too. However, you can sit down, listen to the other’s point of view and go forward with a united front. This is mandatory for the child and the parents and for the family to survive as a unit. The single parent has to do it all with no break. In this case, finding your extended family (blood and other) is very important for you and your child to thrive. You need a break. Don’t be afraid to reach out if patience is wearing thin in either case. Some strategies that have worked for me to maintain patience or find it again are the following:

  1. Finding 5-10 minutes of alone time every day: This could be through meditation, prayer, sitting in nature, going for a massage etc. You need to connect to you to find your power center again.
  2. Call or meet up with a friend at least once a month: Connections to each other have been known to build immunity, strength, resilience in times of stress. Call up a friend on the phone, meet for lunch, a coffee, a drink and laugh. Oh yes, make sure you laugh as it is medicine for the soul.
  3. Exercise: Walking, aerobics, running. Your body think and handles stress so much better when it is healthy and fit from physical activity. Michael’s Dad gets up early and walks to the bus stop when he can’t make the gym. Likewise I get up at an early hour now to do my workout to recharge for the day.
  4. Watch a funny movie or read a great book: Escaping through a great film, book or reading poetry or looking at beautiful artwork can remind us of beauty that is all around. It’s so important when we are frazzled to remember that.
  5. Spas, baths or swimming: Being in water can recharge us in a way nothing else can. If you are able to, once the kid(s) are in bed, try lighting some candles, putting on soft music and taking a bath. It can do wonders.

 

Exceptional Parents, what do you do to build your patience arsenal? What has and has not worked? Remember, you know your body best, and you need to be at your best to stay strong and resilient for the tough times you will encounter with your children. However, it is also important to stay strong so you can enjoy the beautiful moments and the happy times you will have with your Exceptional Child/dren. There will be many, I promise you.  Until next time.

Feeling stressed about special needs parenting? You are not alone. Download my FREE EBOOK on “5 WAYS TO MANAGE EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY ANXIETY” here: http://www.exceptionalparenting.site88.net. 

 

How My Exceptional Child Is Helping Me Learn To De-Clutter My Life

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How many times have I said to myself I need to organize things in my house? I think all of us, unless we are blessed to be born minimalists, have had this same conversation. Then comes children and all the toys and things that they bring with them. Ironically though, it has been since I became a Mom that I have really become aware that I need to de-clutter. And it has been Michael, of course, who has taught this to me. The first few years of motherhood were so fraught getting used to being a Mom, then helping Michael with therapy that I did not stop to see all the junk that was building up in my house. Michael has helped me see, and occasionally even helped me to figure out what needs to stay and what needs to go. For instance we were having a conversation last week about which toys he wanted to keep.

“I’ll show you which toys you can give away Mommy. They are baby toys. I don’t play with them anymore an you can give them to my old preschool or to a children’s charity.”

I am very proud that he is picking up on these good habits and wants to de clutter his playroom and room. I have get rid of so many things that I no longer need, clothes, papers, books that I have read. It’s just a little intimidating to know where to start, but Michael is helping me prioritize things as usual. I will be looking through my clothes and sorting them by season, but what I have really found needs to be organized is his playroom. He has not interest in spending time there in part I’m sure, in that it is a mess. Most of our kids thrive in orderly, non cluttered surroundings. It’s important as parents we set aside some time to clear those areas. How can we go about doing this?  It’s important we learn to be honest with ourselves about what needs to stay and what needs to go. What do our children really play with? What have they lost interest with?

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On another level, Michael is also helping me see which people and experiences I still need to keep in my life. We grow apart from some people as we age and outgrow some things. It is an important part of growing up and into our true selves that we learn when we need to let go of the past so our present can get better and our future can bloom. The fall has always been a time of cleansing for me. Usually, prior to working, by now I would have ordered a lot of the mess in the house. I may be a little behind schedule, but this year I am less panicked about it. Michael has reminded me that sometimes waiting is better so we have an idea of what needs to be organized where. We also can take better stock when we have time to think, unplug and relax as I did the last two weekends, or at least as far as unplugging from cleaning. 🙂

Exceptional Parents, how has your Exceptional Child taught you order and clearing out the mess, physical and emotional clutter in your life? I’m sure if you look close enough, you will see their wise influence. Kids sense when we are off, when we need to make changes in our physical and emotional environments. Listen to their words. Watch their moods and see for yourself, if emotional and physical clearing out doesn’t feel just a little bit better. Until next time.

 

Feeling stressed about special needs parenting? You are not alone. Download my FREE EBOOK on “5 WAYS TO MANAGE EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY ANXIETY” here: http://www.exceptionalparenting.site88.net. 

How This Exceptional Mom Embraces Failure Now And How It Helps Her To Grow

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Dad and I made some communication mistakes over the weekend. Nothing dire happened. There were some misunderstandings with Michael, and some little fights but nothing serious. I actually felt sorry for Michael, though like any kid, he played us a little and tried negotiating more “stuff” for himself. What it brought home to me last night while Dad and I talked, was how important it is for both parents to be on the same page no matter what. That also means parents have to make the time to communicate about their child in a busy household. This is not always easy when there are other stresses and commitments, but somehow it must be done.

I found myself on another long walk with Michael yesterday late afternoon. Unlike a previous one where a slew of behaviors came out on his end, yesterday he was an angel. I found myself getting angry, dumping my emotions on my child (something I’m not proud that I regressed briefly to doing), and seeing how I could use this moment to keep beating myself up as a mother and parent or learn from it. I embraced my failure on that walk yesterday, and asked myself, what was it teaching me? I learned that I needed to get back to communicating more clearly with my partner about childcare and what our roles would be. I needed to be able to make that clear to Michael. Finally, I realized I needed to practice better self-care for me by reminding myself what I needed to stay strong. That is how things would move much more smoothly.

We may think we exist in a vacuum or our feelings do, but that is not true. We all are entitled to our feelings, however they affect those around us. That is why talking, planning and being clear to everyone in your family is so important for happiness and stability of all its members. And if it doesn’t happen, embrace the failure and learn from it. Admit it to your child and partner, and you will all grow stronger for it. Trust me on this. Our family has.

Exceptional Parents, how do you react to mistakes and failures? How do your children handle theirs? It is so important to teach everyone in your household that we all do things wrong from time to time. As long as we learn from it and make sure those around us do the same, we will be moving on to a happier and healthier path in the future. Until next time .

 

Feeling stressed about fall and back to school? You are not alone. Download my FREE EBOOK on “5 WAYS TO MANAGE EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY ANXIETY” here: http://www.exceptionalparenting.site88.net. 

Late Buses And Stress-The New Way This Exceptional Family Handles The Unexpected

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Michael never ceases to amaze me. He will freak out over things like taking a certain street he doesn’t like, or if I don’t let him choose his snacks. Understandably, he wants control, but sometimes he is really upset over this. His bus coming late this morning and bringing him home super late? For that, he was only mildly perturbed you could say. What set him off? When I told him we wouldn’t have time to go to the park due to the late hour. But after giving him his space and taking mine, he recovered quickly. I am truly amazed at what he is able to start handling, and even when he does get upset, like insulting me or overturning furniture he will look at me or Dad as if to say, “what are you going to do about it?” Instead, we calmly explain, “we don’t hit, scream, insult or throw things when we get upset. Neither do you. Use your strategies.”

The first day of school is always a little bit of a whirlwind what with the bus routes changing and the drivers having to learn a new way to go. Then, there is the fact that we had work being done by the city on our own street yesterday which further complicated matters. Well, that’s life right. I thought how ironic, that it is all happening at once but sometimes that’s how it goes and you have to learn to go with the flow. You have to make the best of it. I tell Michael this all the time. Now I am living it, or doing my best to when I briefly forget my words. Explaining all these changes to Michael was not easy, but he surprised me. He handled it, asked some questions, and then we went with our evening, I went from being a ” bad mother who I won’t hug” due to no park when he got home, to at bedtime, “the best mother I could ever have.”

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Seeing how I handled the unpredictability  yesterday too made me feel pretty proud of me. I had come very far from the anxious type A woman I have been for most of my life. I used to also try and control things, or at the very least, worry compulsively about them. That was my way of trying to feel more powerful in my life where I had felt so powerless in many ways. That changed when I saw how I could have power, peace and control if I learned how to let go. I do this by meditating and living in the moment. Sometimes I stumble, I fall and I get back up. This is the lesson I want Michael to learn. It is important I practice it myself.

Exceptional Parents, how does stress impact your Exceptional Child? What lessons have you learned from teaching your child to handle stress? Don’t worry if there are times you have not set the best example. Apologize to your child, and talk to them about both of you using your strategies to calm down and move on better the next time. We are all human and need to learn from one another. Until next time.

 

Feeling stressed about fall and back to school? You are not alone.  Download my FREE EBOOK on “5 WAYS TO MANAGE EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY ANXIETY” here: http://www.exceptionalparenting.site88.net. 

 

Annual BBQ’s and Exceptional Traditions

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I love traditions. I love the way they mark time, passages, and growth. I also love the way traditions bring family and friends together. Michael’s Dad and I started a tradition a long time ago with close friends where we all get together once a year at our house for a BBQ lunch or dinner. It has shifted back and forth, but now it is back to a dinner so friends of mine who have smaller children don’t have to worry about their kids missing their nap, and my other friends with older children and activity commitments can still make it. Still, the friends of mine who don’t have children also have the opportunity of squeezing our dinner into their busy schedules. As a result, we’ve pretty much had everybody make it every  year for the past eighteen years that we’ve been doing it. These are friends I grew up with. We knew each other as girls, then women, then husbands and now children are in the mix. It’s absolutely wonderful.

For Michael, he is also learning about how important friendships are, and about the building of traditions to keep friendships going and moving smoothly into changes that occur in life. These friends are his aunties and uncles so to speak, and he gets along well with their kids. It’s always a fun way for us to end our summer with this BBQ. Now that Michael is older, he actively helps us prepare by buying the food, and tidying up a bit. Alright, he cleans his room, but still it is a start. 🙂 I am so proud of how far he has come from being overwhelmed by people, to looking forward to a party, even though there are challenging moments for him.

Exceptional Parents, do you have any summer time traditions that you participate in with your Exceptional Child? How do they respond? How do you respond? Remember, give them time to grow to love these traditions and soon they will begin to change their response to them. It also gives you a chance as a family to grow together, try new things, and form new memories. Until next time.

 

How To Plan Out Your Exceptional Family’s First Overnight Trip Together

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Alright wish us luck. We will be going soon for our very first overnight family outing together. In a hotel. The three of us. With Michael’s sleep routine being slightly altered, and all of us sleeping in the same room. I hope it works out, but I am optimistic like never before. We have been talking about it. We will be planning out the two days, one night trip as much as possible in advance, and we will, as always, be bringing Michael’s tools to help him: sensory brush, squeeze or fidget toys, offering him breaks, and using our beloved token system for a reward offered at the end of the day before bedtime. I will also be crossing toes, fingers and any other body part that it all works out.

A friend of mine told me a while ago, “when Mom is ready, the child is ready.” Most of my Mom friends of Exceptional Children have all taken family trips overnight, in an airplane or car, and did what other families did. Not us. Dad and I were not ready. Now we are. I also feel that Michael is ready. He is nervous/excited but older, able to tell us his needs and wants more clearly, and even when we fight or have a rough time, all us have strategies, better strategies to cope. This wasn’t the case a year, two and more ago. Maybe I had strategies, or Dad or Michael, but not all of us had our strategies intact. On that note, here are some ways that are helping our family best prepare for our first overnight trip out of town:

  1. Pack bags in advance with clothes, toys and portable sensory equipment : This is a no-brainer, but really do it as much in advance as possible. And bring clothes, snacks, games, fidget toys, and other tools that will keep your child calm and regulated. Trust your instincts and leave nothing behind.
  2. Bring snacks, water, Lysol and baby wipes IN DROVES: This is important as well. I learned the lesson a hard way a few years ago when we were stuck on a beach and his hands were dirty and I did not have enough of the above wipes to sanitize. Good we were with a friend who gave us some of hers.
  3. Bring jackets, rain gear in case of unpredictable weather: This goes without saying, but bring for everyone. You don’t want to get stuck in a storm and get drenched.
  4. Make sure to have emergency cash and small change: This comes in handy so you can allow the occasional treat for your child or yourself.
  5. Take child’s comfort toys books for bed: Make sure they have what they need to be comfy for as similar a nighttime routine as you can get.
  6. Write out social story and plan out as much as you can in advance: This is important if it is your first time. We are writing out a general plan and allowing for modifications. Michael will make some, we will make some, and we will remind him of unpredictable things that could happen and what he can use as his tools to cope.

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The most important thing to do is be as organized in your bags and as concrete in your plans as possible. Children, all children, gravitate to a steady plan and a steady hand. Mom and Dad need to be on the same page all the time, or do their best to get back there if they veer off. We all do, and there is no shame. Do your best.

Exceptional Parents, how did you handle your first away trip or are you still contemplating whether the family is ready? Whatever you do and wherever you are, remember. You know your child and family best. You know when all of you are ready for the next adventure. Always trust that feeling and adjust as you go along. Until next time.

Are you having a tough anxious summer in your family? Looking for new tools and strategies to handle anxiety, yours or your child’s? Download my FREE EBOOK on 5 WAYS TO MANAGE EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY ANXIETY here: http://www.exceptionalparenting.site88.net.