Category: Routine changes

Consistency Is Key-How To Set Boundaries With Your Exceptional Child

I realized  as soon as the words were out of my mouth that I would have to follow through. Oh no. There would be no outing to the park tonight as the evening before Michael was not listening and had lots of inappropriate behaviors towards me. There had been times I’d missed this cue and not reacted by giving a consequence in time. What had this caused? Inconsistency in how Michael looked for attention and got it from me. Dad has been having the same problem. We realized that due to him being a very detail-oriented kid who needs to know what is happening at all times, we also needed to be more aware of setting more boundaries as to what is acceptable and not. In trying to move away from a strict schedule and trying to teach Michael to be more flexible, we had forgotten to set boundaries on what is appropriate for him to say or do.

Michael is a sensory child. He will want to hug or squeeze you. He will also sometimes come in your personal space. We are now realizing we need to remind him about each person’s personal bubble and how important it is to respect that. We also need to teach him what is appropriate to say or not. All our exceptional kids have their quirks about behavior and expectation. Just remember that as a parent we all forget from time to time to keep the universal rules in place. With kids with ASD and  different brains, however, a common rule set is really important to keep families functioning smoothly and expectations clear. Here are some tips to keep in mind:

  1. Write down family rules: This is good in any family, but especially in exceptional ones where kids can have an idea what to expect.
  2. Have a rewards  system for good behavior: If your child responds well to it, have a rewards system for good behavior with details on what they could earn.
  3. Both parents need to have same set of rules: It’s important that rules apply across the board with both sets of parents.
  4. Praise the good: Sometimes as parents we forget to look at the good behavior and only focus on the bad. Change that mindset.
  5. Have stable routines: Have a stable bedtime, daytime and all other times family routine. This will help your child feel more secure.

Exceptional Parents, how do you keep consistency in your family for behavior and other things? If you are not always doing things the same way, stop and think how this is affecting  your child’s and your stress level. You can solve so much  anxiety and stress with keeping consistent in how you respond to your child and other family events. You will see how this will help you all as a family grow stronger and be happier. Until next time.

I am a writer, speaker and parent coach. I blog about how my exceptional son with autism and type 1 diabetes is raising me to a better human being and exceptional mom. My mission is to empower other exceptional parents to trust in their parenting instinct while letting their exceptional child open their eyes to all that is possible! For more information on my coaching services and to download a copy of my FREE EBOOK “5 WAYS TO HANDLE EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY ANXIETY” see my website, http://www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com.

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Summer Fun For Exceptional Families-Finding The Balance

As usual but in a different way, Michael had a difficult start to the summer and me with him. Every year there seems to be something that carries over. I also know that the break of routine with school is hard for him, as much as he likes to be home. He also likes to be busy. Anyone who knows Michael and our family, knows that we keep him busy. He is a curious, energetic and social kid. Staying home is not for him. Even with the emotional struggles he has been going through, I have noticed that, as always, there is his spirit of resilience. He is so hard on himself. He fears a lot. Yet he is one of the most fearless people I know. I tell him this. I tell him, “you are my hero. I admire your energy, your excitement about learning new things. And now, I’m not sure if it’s maturity, puberty, or something else, but he is more conscious of how he wants to self-regulate and control his emotions. He pretty much likes the same activities he liked as a child, but now has the patience to stay at them longer. It’s great, and especially on those days when your child is stressed, keeping them active can really help with regulation.

Here are my suggestions for fun inexpensive things to do with your exceptional tween over the summer:

  1. Swimming at local pool or splash pads: This is a must with our hotter and hotter summers. Michael now could spend a good two to two and a half hours or more frolicking at these places.
  2. Parks playing sports: Yes, he will still go on swings and slides, but does not like the little parks with no fields anymore. His main interest is playing soccer in the field, and possibly tennis and basketball in the courts with me or a friend.
  3. Library: He loves to read tween literature and fantasy to boot! He reads to me now, and when he stumbles over words, it’s a great time to bond while I explain it to him.
  4. Art: Painting, clay or any other means of self-expression is something a child this age can do to burn off steam
  5. Movies: Yes, once our kids are able to sit still calmly and focus, take them to matinees. It’s a great way to pass the afternoon.
  6. Structured activities: Most communities now have adapted sports activities for kids though some exceptional kids do fine with smaller teams. We always do soccer, and sometimes tennis over the summer. There are lots of options. See what interests your child.
  7. Camp: Even if it’s not for a long time, camp usually gives exceptional kids a different chance to be active, meet new faces, and grow. There are lots of options.

Exceptional Parents, how are you looking to keep your little ones busy? The most important thing to do is balance out unstructured time at home with a camp or structured activity. This usually means that kids get a balance and are happier over the summer when  a lot of their regular structure is gone. Here’s to good times ahead with your child. Until next time.

Letting Your Exceptional Child Be Your Teacher When The Day Goes Differently

 

 

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So today was one of those days that did not go anything like I had thought or planned. Michael was not feeling well so he stayed home, which meant I stayed home from work and things did not go as they were scheduled to go on the first day back to work/school. But I did other things. I cleaned. I did some freelance writing work. I talked with my child. When I saw that he was feeling better by the afternoon and he asked me if he could help me cook I agreed. And Michael did a fantastic job. He cooked under my supervision asking me for certain spices that he had seen on a recipe show online. We talked. I enjoyed seeing him do something he loved-cooking. The focus was there. I had some moments today when I was feeling worried, particularly about the weather though I got to enjoy it from the comforts of my home, but looking at Michael and seeing how he was feeling healthy and calm, something that he has not been for awhile, made me realize that I needed to continue to stay calm too. I needed to continue to set a positive example for Michael about what it is like to live in the moment, and laugh in the face of the unpredictability of how things go sometimes. I also let Michael set the pace of the day-computer time, talking, cooking and it was a mellow day. We had some good times over the holidays, but not nearly as relaxed ironically enough. Sometimes the orchestrated days, play dates and planned family outings do not go the way a day that is unplanned can go. A parent can see their child’s character truly shine through and take the lead.

Our children teach us new things every day. They teach us through their joy, their anger, their laughter, their pain. It’s up to us to follow them, and let them show us how we can learn new things if once in a while we admit we may not know it all as parents. We teach our kids how to do so many things, but they also teach us to live, love and believe that sometimes we may not have all the answers and need to ask questions. We need to remember that sometimes the teacher is the one learning and that is perfect. For all we teach our children they also teach us many things about ourselves- patience, humility, laughter, happiness, how we handle risk and fear. And while we share with them our life experience, they can share with us their innocence and belief that the world has many faces and directions. They can help us see that there are many sides to people, to events, to opportunities.

Exceptional Parents, with all the challenges you face raising your Exceptional Children, do you sometimes miss the magical moments when they teach you about life? It’s ok.  Just remember every unpredictable turn, every spontaneous action is a chance to learn what life looks like through your child’s eyes, and what life can look like through your eyes if you give it a chance. Until next time.

I am a writer, speaker and parent coach. I blog about how my exceptional son with autism and type 1 diabetes is raising me to a better human being and exceptional mom. My mission is to empower other exceptional parents to trust in their parenting instinct while letting their exceptional child open their eyes to all that is possible! For more information on my coaching services and to download a copy of my FREE EBOOK “5 WAYS TO HANDLE EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY ANXIETY” see my website, http://www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com.

Organizing Surprise Home Days And What Exceptional Kids Teach Us About Stress

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So today was a surprise Snow Day for Michael and me . He was happy, of course, happy and nervous. Happy to be home, and nervous as he did not want to be stuck at home all day. He woke up pretty much structuring all the “places” we would go. Michael is not a home body. Teaching him to limit his outings has been a challenge, and though I am happy he does not want to sit in front of a computer screen all day, I cannot always take him out to 4 places a day as he likes even on Snow Days when school is closed and I have to stay home from work as a result. Of course, he would have understood the concept of staying home all day had the weather been pretty terrible for driving.  As it turned out, it cleared up pretty nicely. And though he eventually accepted staying home in the am, in the pm he was excited when I suggested our first sledding adventure of the winter season as the driving conditions were good.  How did we get to starting off the day horribly with fighting and stalling with his injection to this point? Michael realized after our fight the necessity of creating a visual schedule for himself when he is home with me unexpectedly, and following the ones we already have in place on weekends.

I have to say that I was at my wits’ end being challenged by his retorts to all the simple requests I made of him, only to be so happy when he sighed and admitted he needed to make a schedule to organize our day. And off he went! I can pretty much tell you, other than some minor ups and downs, the day went well after he had his schedule where he checked off all he would be doing. We also talked about expectations of good behavior and how that would be rewarded, and how bad behavior would have a negative consequence he would not like, ie. he lost his afternoon and evening IPAD for rude and disrespectful comments and actions. I know this will have to happen many more times before the lesson is learned, but I was happy Michael was starting to connect the dots of how he needed to act and how he needed to use better strategies to cope with his anger, anxiety and fear. We are working on getting him new ones, and in the new year with a new team, I know we will have new strategies and options as well.

After the schedule was constructed, it was pretty much followed. We had fun sledding, then came home and Michael watched a holiday movie while I prepared dinner. All in all a good way to end the day. I learned how routine still works for us, even with severe behavioral challenges and anxiety. This kept me going through a day with many retorts to my authority. I was able to remember the good moments when Michael shared beautiful stories from school, funny anecdotes, and did some spontaneous snow angels which looked great!

Exceptional Parents, does a daily schedule work well for you in your home? Does it help your child stay on track and make the day go easier? In most cases, this helps tremendously for both child and parental stress. What can also work is reminding your child of what control they do exert over their day, and how they need to balance this with your control for their well-being. In this way, everyone will grow and the whole family will be happier and get along better. Until next time.

I am a writer, speaker and parent coach. I blog about how my exceptional son with autism and type 1 diabetes is raising me to a better human being and exceptional mom. My mission is to empower other exceptional parents to trust in their parenting instinct while letting their exceptional child open their eyes to all that is possible! For more information on my coaching services and to download a copy of my FREE EBOOK “5 WAYS TO HANDLE EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY ANXIETY” see my website, http://www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com

The Power of Repetition and Good Routines in Exceptional Families

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If I have to remind him to use his strategies one more time I will go stark raving mad, I thought to myself for the umpteenth time the other afternoon after Michael had lost his cool and I had told him to go to his room and use his strategies. I had also warned him when he came home from school that day that he seemed stressed and might want to use his strategies. Sometimes I feel more like a parrot than a mother going over the same terrain over and over. If it’s not verbal it’s been visual on pictos in the past or schedules in the last two years, but going over the same things is a common theme in our house. Has it worked? Yes and no. I can use the wheels turning in Michael’s head as he processes that he has to make changes and use strategies BEFORE he tantrums or loses control, but the system is far from perfect. Some of the time he is successful which is very encouraging, but there are more times that he only realizes AFTER the fact what he needed to do. That’s ok. Rome wasn’t built in one day, as they say, and if I know one thing about exceptional kids is that they need to do things many times to get it right. Heck though, once they get it right it is right forever.

Routines are the same. Get your exceptional child into a healthy routine and the results are amazing. Get them into an unhealthy routine, and it’s bad. Real bad. They get stuck, have meltdowns due to exhaustion, over stimulation, and even those children that can express themselves have a hard time seeing their triggers at the beginning. Michael is only beginning in the last year to see his own anger triggers. The main one is hearing the  word NO. Others are not feeling listened to. Michael’s version is if we are not stopping everything to pay attention to him, this means drinking water, coffee, not just the obvious. I’ve had to explain to him that I can focus on him just fine while having my coffee. 🙂 Finally other triggers have been feeling out of control with food choices, directions and other activities. Whenever I can I have given him choices and the feeling of having control, while at the same time teaching him that sometimes he will not be in control and have to handle following rules and regulations that his parents and teachers have laid out for him. It is getting easier as he is learning to tell apart where he can have control over where he has to follow rules.

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Regardless, routines are also all about repetition and making sure things unfold in a certain way. Whenever we’ve had a challenging evening as a family, I realize that most off the time it is due to me or Michael changing the routine. While it is good to throw things up in the air once in awhile so that the child does not become too rigid, a certain amount of predictability is important for the whole family’s mental stability and health. As hard as it is to stay in a routine and repeat yourself, all parents who do this, with or without exceptional kids, report that this helps make their family life more manageable. When I get discouraged and feel I can’t do this anymore, I think about these two things, routine and repetition, and remember how it is mine and Michael’s saving grace in times of great upheaval and change.

Exceptional Parents, what has been the key to success for you and your child in your family? What has helped you and your child move past behaviors and negative moments? If you have not tried a regular routine and repetition with important mood enhancers like using strategies, then now is the time to try it.  Yes, therapies work. Medication works. But having a family plan of what to expect as well as how to self-regulate can make all the difference in the world to being able to cope with life’s strains and stresses. Until next time.

I am a writer, speaker and parent coach whose son with Autism and Type 1 Diabetes has shown me a whole new way to see the world and embrace the joy of  living in the moment! I believe in empowering parents to trust their own instincts when it comes to their children, and in helping them parent with love, respect and confidence on their own exceptional parenting journey.

For more information on my coaching services,  for a FREE 30 min consultation, and to receive a  copy of my FREE E-BOOK “5 WAYS TO HANDLE EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY ANXIETY,” see my website: www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com. 

The Invisibility of Autism And Handling Unexpected Circumstance

 

Yesterday late afternoon was one of those days I wish Michael had some sort of sign identifying his autism to the world. I don’t often wish for this, not because his autism is anything that is bad, but because I truly believe that no one should be thought of as one of the many things that define them. Michael has autism, but he also has an amazing brain for navigating, a great sense of humor, and a terrific singing voice. But yesterday arriving at the our local pool for his swimming lesson, the unexpected through his orderly world into a tailspin. A normal routine of him changing in the family change room with me keeping him on target with time and setting up his clothes in a change stall so he does not walk around the room naked did not happen. With it being Spring Break in our neck of the woods, it was public swim at the local pool as well. There were many families who took their little ones to enjoy an afternoon of swimming indoors on a dreary rainy day.

We arrived at the locker room and it was packed with tons of parents and kids. I’d never seen it like this before though. We had ten minutes to change and no free stalls or areas to change. I knew Michael would have to go into the men’s changing room as he could not come with me in the women’s. He is not 6 years of age or under anymore. I prepared him for this, and I had raised my voice to be heard above the chaos in the change room that he would need to change for his swimming lesson in the men’s locker room. That’s when one of the mothers told me that there had been a serious swimming accident with a child and that they had cleared the pool. No one was allowed in. It was not the pool we usually swam in, but as the shock of what had happened took over me, I uttered the usual, oh my goodness, and then thanked her for telling me.

I explained to Michael this new change and went back to the front desk to see about the lesson. We waited and few minutes later someone came back to tell us that we would have the lesson and where to go. I went over with Michael verbally what he had to do, but he had problems in the locker room. He asked if I could wait outside. Then he didn’t know where the stalls were and kept walking around half naked in the room. Finally, I could hear voices of other boys telling him to put his clothes on. The main door to the locker room was open so he came a few times to say hi. Suffice it to say, it was stressful for both of us.He was angry that those boys were “yelling” at him. I explained they were trying to help him. They didn’t know he had autism and was not sure what to do. I explained that he could have asked them where he could change and ask questions. I did not know the layout of the room and could not go with him. So a sign or some  sort of indicating that he has challenges with sequencing and changes in routine would have been helpful here. But that is life. It is unpredictable and we have to teach our kids with autism how to go with the flow and handle the unforseen. In the end after some arguments and tension, we moved on.

Exceptional Parents, how many times have you found yourself in situations where your child can’t process what is happening around them and others do not know that there is a reason why? How do you handle it? Ideally, parents need to stay calm and firm, and afterwards use it as a learning experience. All children need to learn to go with the flow, and though it is harder for Exceptional Kids, with time and effort it is possible. Until next time.

It’s Spring Break-How To Structure It In Town

Today is the first day of Michael’s Spring Break, and Spring Break for a lot of children and their families. For Exceptional Children Spring Break can be a great time, but there are also  moments when it is hard on them. The trick is providing the right amount of structure with some downtime. The thing is, Exceptional Children need both just like all other children, but they each they own formula for what works. After all, they are just individuals like each of us. So, how does a parent know where to start? Well, in my case, following my parenting gut, I know what works best for Michael. He needs a lot less structured time than when he was younger, as well as some unstructured time. Dad and I have been learning how to fine tune some of his schedule to give him a mix of both. The thing is, we have to find the right combination or we will all have a  really hard day with sensory overloads, anxiety and stress. What are some basic things parents can do to structure Spring Break? Here are 5 things:

  1. Plan out week on calendar: Plan out the weekly activities on a calendar or schedule. Make sure there are indoor and outdoor options as weather can be finicky, as well it allows for flexibility.
  2. Decide how early or late starting your day: Some kids are super excited they are up super early (like mine). Some kids like to sleep in. See in advance where your child falls and adjust your own sleep and wake schedule. You’ll be grateful you did!
  3. Make play dates in advance: If your child has friends or you have friends with kids their age, consider scheduling one or two play dates to get them out of the house. This will help with socializing.
  4.  Let them have in unstructured or down time: In this time, let them do whatever they want, including stimming if that helps them unwind and balance their sensory system.
  5. Schedule in some parent down time early am or late pm: It’s important for Moms and Dads not to burn out so self-care is important too. It’s your vacation too as you are spending quality time with your child/dren, but it can quickly go out of hand if you are tired and stressed. Self-care is just as important this week as during other breaks like Christmas or Summer.

 

Exceptional Parents, how are you spending Spring Break? What are some of your tricks for enjoying it and surviving it intact, you and your child? All jokes aside, it really can be a fun time even if you stay in town and it seems less glamorous. Remember, it’s your attitude as a parent that can make it fun or not. Be adventurous, relax when you can, and don’t be afraid to have fun! Until next time.

Mother/Son Bonding And How Change Can Bring Exceptional Families Closer

It is the morning that Michael heads out to winter camp with his school for two nights and three days. It is his second year going and he is so excited as am I! Last year we were all “nervous excited”. Dad and I knew he would enjoy the time with friends, activities, but worried about his sleeping regime. At home that was still a major challenge last year. But this year his sleeping is going relatively well, he knows what to expect at camp as do Dad and I, and Dad and I have even scheduled in a little late afternoon spa and dinner getaway this year. It is more relaxing all around already due to the familiarity of everything for all of us. What has also been surprising is Michael’s affectionate attitude towards Dad and I the last few days. He has been listening better. He has been calmer. And he was so happy that I was postponing my writing work until after he went to bed to have quality time with him. He said as much.

I think even when we are there for our children in concrete ways, they sense if we are not present spiritually and mentally with them as we are physically. Many children act out in order to get attention from us as they feel like we are tolerating them, when really it is just the opposite. Parents are overwhelmed by so much these days. They barely have the fuel to keep going and often are exhausted. But their kids need to know they matter at the top of the list. I have started showing Michael this in many ways, by taking care to talk to him, spend time hugging and cuddling, and reminding him that he is the top over everything else. In whatever way it works, most parents need to know their child and how to remind them that they matter above all else, particularly before a big change like sleep away camp, a big event at school, or something else that matters.

Exceptional Parents, how do you show your Exceptional Child that they are top in your books? How do you make “special time” with them? It is important to verbally reinforce it with them, and then physically deliver. Stop looking at your phone every five seconds. Guilty of that one myself as charged. When kids feel you are connected to them on every level, they will not act out and test at all or as much. They will know that you, their parent, are there to help them through the next hurdle. Until next time.

Bedtime Separation And Puberty-New Exceptional Issues

So I have been noticing that we now have new problems with Michael at bedtime. He cooperates, to a certain extent with the routine, but then will end up moving at a snail’s pace and slowing down when he needs to keep moving. When I gently and later impatiently remind him that there is no time to finish the rest of his routine, he is shocked. Sometimes we have a little fight, other times he is just bewildered. I see we need to get started earlier and earlier until he learns how to tell time and what to expect when he goes slow. I also am wondering if the stalling and slowing down is due to his dislike of the nighttime and sleep. Separating has always been hard. He was so upset the other night when I told him I not only could not do massage, but I could not lie down with him due to the lateness of the hour. I am slowly seeing what changes we need to make in the bedtime routine.

I have decided I will be giving Michael a little more choice in what he includes in his routine, and also that he must do this in a reasonable time. He is pushing me away a bit now with the onset of puberty by openly saying he does not want to tell me certain things about his day, yet then at night there is this desire for me to put him to bed, lie down with him, not Dad. I think it is the push/pull of maturity and the fear of loss. He will also say, “tonight is our baking night. You are not working.” He is happy and wants to spend time with me, yet then hugs and kisses are restricted. So typical, yet there is an autism twist to it. “You can kiss me on this cheek, not that one.” He likes us to call him by his full name now only, not a nickname. Before it was only everyone else, now Mom and Dad too. All these rules and pulling away means he is growing up. New ways of handling this stage are being developed, and I am glad that now that we have a behavior management plan in place, I can see where he is truly struggling , where he is testing, and where he is hurting. I know more how to help now.

Exceptional Parents, are your Exceptional Children doing the push/pull/back again thing? Are they at that stage? Maybe they are just clingy all the time and driving you crazy. Remember, there is always a reason for their behavior. They are trying to figure things out in the world. Stay calm and patient as you learn to read their signals, and remember, you and they will grow stronger together as a result. Until next time.

SPECIAL OFFER: February is the month of love. We show love to our children, partners and friends But what about to ourselves as parents? Do you know how to practice self-care and truly love the amazing parent and person you are? If you need support in this area of your life, until Feb. 28th I am offering a FREE ONE HOUR one on one coaching session, as well as a second one hour one on one coaching session at 50% off regular price. Give yourself the gift of self-love, and learn some great tools to begin to put your needs first so you can parent in balance. Contact me at joanne@creatingexceptionalparenting.com or 514-827-7175 to book your Skype session. www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com

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Navigating Social Interactions And Helping Exceptional Children Handle Rigidity

Over the weekend I took Michael to a local winter carnival. It was overall a success, but there were some moments, where Michael as usual, through me some curve balls as far as behavior and comprehension was concerned. Some of it was vintage Michael.  What I mean was that with some of it  I am truly seeing is part of his particularly quirky character and how he approaches people. This is both part of his very social and friendly self where he asks everyone their name and introduces himself, and where I see the traits that are part of his autism side, the side that has a hard time reading other people’s facial expressions and looking for cues in the environment to know what is going to happen. He also talks loudly, which I know is part of his family background, (we all talk loudly in our family), and but it is also sensory and due to anxiety. As a parent, I walk the line of trying to teach Michael to balance these two sides of his personality as he is getting older. It is not always easy.  Then I have the task of disciplining him when he says, “I can’t help it. I have autism.” I almost laughed and cried the first time I heard him say it. It is impressive and frustrating that he would say that to try and get away with bad behavior. He is learning now though, that there are limits and how to navigate them.

I am seeing a lot of control issues though lately around perceived mistakes that he makes and others make. He cannot tolerate these. The swearing he does is when we do things he does not like, to his father, I or another adult making mistakes. With other adults, he does not swear out loud though, which is a good thing. In his view, these are when things are not done or said perfectly. I feel so bad for him that he has to see the world so black and white, yet frustrated for myself that it is hard to break into that and show him flexibility. I imagine all that extra stress he carries around with him due to these self-imposed demands. Only call me this name, repeat the phrase like this etc. I know this is his way as it is for a lot of people with autism, to control a world that is uncontrollable and moving at a speed that is often too fast and complicated for him and his nervous system. I sometimes stop in the course of my day and see what a crazy fast-paced world we live in where things happen in seconds and you have to cope, act, react appropriately. Information comes at all of us constantly. Demands are placed on all of us to perform faster in our jobs yet with more accuracy. There is so much to do, so little time. We feel bad when we take “time off” which is not really off.  Our electronic devices are with us and/or we are thinking about what we need to do next.

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Unplugging is something I am starting to do more of in 2017, and want to slowly introduce my family to. A lot of friends are starting to do this, friends with neuro typical kids. People sense the difference in mindset. This goes beyond daily meditation and yoga and weekly exercise. These things are hugely helpful in staying mindful and present-centered. That is the place from which we make the best decisions. But every once in a while a total mental health break is important too. Detach and head off into nature, curl up with a book, play a board game with family. Stay in the moment and learn how to relax and unwind again. This is mandatory for our Exceptional Children and for us as parents to recharge our batteries and be able to model good problems solving skills and a happier and more balanced life. We will also be able to help our children more when we ourselves are relaxed.

Exceptional Parents, how do you unplug and stay more in the moment? What are some tricks you’ve learned to show your kids? Whether they have autism or not, these are challenging times for our children. They need our help to find ways to relax, stay on task, and read the world around them. Kids with autism have it harder for sure, but it is never impossible. Start with small steps by modeling your own problem solving skills and how you get out in nature to unplug. Soon they will be able to follow suit and learn ways to handle stress better. Until next time.

SPECIAL OFFER: February is the month of love. We show love to our children, partners and friends But what about to ourselves as parents? Do you know how to practice self-care and truly love the amazing parent and person you are? If you need support in this area of your life, until Feb. 28th I am offering a FREE ONE HOUR one on one coaching session, as well as a second one hour one on one coaching session at 50% off regular price. Give yourself the gift of self-love, and learn some great tools to begin to put your needs first so you can parent in balance. Contact me at joanne@creatingexceptionalparenting.com or 514-827-7175 to book your Skype session. www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com

 

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