Month: February 2017

Mother/Son Bonding And How Change Can Bring Exceptional Families Closer

It is the morning that Michael heads out to winter camp with his school for two nights and three days. It is his second year going and he is so excited as am I! Last year we were all “nervous excited”. Dad and I knew he would enjoy the time with friends, activities, but worried about his sleeping regime. At home that was still a major challenge last year. But this year his sleeping is going relatively well, he knows what to expect at camp as do Dad and I, and Dad and I have even scheduled in a little late afternoon spa and dinner getaway this year. It is more relaxing all around already due to the familiarity of everything for all of us. What has also been surprising is Michael’s affectionate attitude towards Dad and I the last few days. He has been listening better. He has been calmer. And he was so happy that I was postponing my writing work until after he went to bed to have quality time with him. He said as much.

I think even when we are there for our children in concrete ways, they sense if we are not present spiritually and mentally with them as we are physically. Many children act out in order to get attention from us as they feel like we are tolerating them, when really it is just the opposite. Parents are overwhelmed by so much these days. They barely have the fuel to keep going and often are exhausted. But their kids need to know they matter at the top of the list. I have started showing Michael this in many ways, by taking care to talk to him, spend time hugging and cuddling, and reminding him that he is the top over everything else. In whatever way it works, most parents need to know their child and how to remind them that they matter above all else, particularly before a big change like sleep away camp, a big event at school, or something else that matters.

Exceptional Parents, how do you show your Exceptional Child that they are top in your books? How do you make “special time” with them? It is important to verbally reinforce it with them, and then physically deliver. Stop looking at your phone every five seconds. Guilty of that one myself as charged. When kids feel you are connected to them on every level, they will not act out and test at all or as much. They will know that you, their parent, are there to help them through the next hurdle. Until next time.

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Navigating Exceptional Family Anxiety And Following Your Child’s Cues

adorable, baby, bear

Spring is around the corner so I know that is one of the reasons Michael is starting to get more anxious He has, however, made great progress with using strategies to handle his stress such as talking about his feelings, going to a calm spot to recharge, and crying without hitting himself, others or property.  I have seen how hard he is working and our home token system has been fine tuned as well. He has been testing us with this, but understands the way it works and overall I am very impressed. He has adjusted to some changes in my work schedule, and now communicates his fears and anger better too. We are happy to see the aggression and horrible language replaced by true expressions of fear and anger and worry. The thing is that Dad and I are worried just how anxious he is about everything and how much control and reassurance he needs to have about everything in his life. Dad and I are worried about how hard he is on himself, how he stresses about things he is good at, and how upset he gets when something can’t get resolved immediately. We are constantly looking to add more tools to his toolbox, and are strongly considering some medication for his anxiety, though we are nervous about this step.  There are pros and cons as with everything else. We need to find out all we can and then make the best decision possible.

At the same time I am beginning to see that Michael needs a little more TLC these days. He is a little clingier in some ways, only wanting me to put him to bed, worried when he can’t find me in the house and talking A LOT when he does find me. Yet, he openly says he does not want to share certain things about his day with me and he does not want me to hug or kiss him unless he specifies when or where on his cheek. As I said before, he is a tween with  some little boy fears left over. I am simply reminding him I am there if he needs me. He has also been there for me too though. When I was feeling particularly stressed one afternoon, he wrapped his arms around me and said, “you’re the best Mommy ever,” and “it’s ok if you are sad or got angry Mommy. We all feel that way sometimes.” My favorite is still when he will give me a big hug/squeeze due to love and sensory issues an then say, “Ahh, I love Mommy’s neck. It is so warm. It is like a spa.” Our relationship has gotten much closer. And even with Dad they fight, but he loves his father very much and jumps up in excitement when Dad’s key turns in the lock. It’s just navigating the worries, the obsessive questions, and the loudness. I know they are all due to stress, and we are doing our best to remind him to pace himself, but it is not always easy. Still, we follow his pace. I have learned new ways Michael needs me.

 

He’ll need me to reassure him, to do a quick drawing or explanation of what’s about to happen or sometimes it’s reminding him how proud I am of him. Other times it is stopping completely what I am doing and focusing on him. He and I both do well with that and it works to help us both feel calm and connected. Last night for the first time in awhile, I was able to give Michael his full bedtime routine. At the end as he wrapped his arms around my neck and we cuddled for the ten minutes I stay in his room, he sighed happily and said, “this is my favorite part of the night. I love when you lie down with me and I can hug you.” My heart melted instantly. I quickly went over all the things I did right and vowed to set us both up for success with future anxious times.

Exceptional Parents, how do you handle your child’s anxiety and stress? What is part of their toolbox and yours? The hardest and most important thing to remember is to stop and really look and listen to your child and where they are coming from. Only when you see their pain and hurt, (and stay calm and centered yourself), can you guide them to make healthier choices for handling stress. Until next time.

 

Finding the Balance of Meeting Your Own Needs and Your Exceptional Child’s

Woman Doing Yoga Near the Sea during DaytimeIt is so hard for any parent the fine line of meeting their own personal needs and those of their exceptional child’s. There are days that are hard for all of us, and unless we are perfectly feeling balance and in control we cannot meet our children’s needs, never mind our own. This is easier said than done. There are days when all of us are feeling rested, calm, and good about ourselves. Those are the days we parent better. Then there are the other days, when we are stressed, tired and having a difficult time. It is normal when you parent an exceptional child to have some days of struggle. Even neuro typical children give us those tough days. These are the days that our children need us, but we either miss their cues due to feeling wiped out ourselves. So the question is how can we find that balance between meeting our needs and those of our children? There is so easy answer.

I like to think most days now I do meet my own personal needs to feel at my best. I know what my personal boundaries are. I try to eat right, exercise regularly, and do daily meditation and yoga. But still there are days, particularly lately when I see who anxious Michael is at night, that I worry I have failed to meet his needs. I stop everything when he comes home after school and then by early evening am stressed to try to get it all done. That is every parent’s issue. But I see that when he seems to want my time the most. He is clingier and last night even acted up in the bathroom at bath time due to loneliness. He said he misses Dad and I being in there with him and supervising bath. We were moving to a new independent stage with him as in the day he is telling us to leave him alone. Go figure. Last night’s incident reminded me how sometimes when we as parents are understandably distracted with life and our own stresses, we may miss signs our children are sending out about needing extra TLC or other feelings. It does not make us bad parents. It makes us human beings that need to balance being in touch with our own feelings of what we are prioritizing when, and how we could not forget the people around us and their feelings. This is not easy to do, but as long as we start from a center of strong self-care-rested, calm, positive, we an ring that into our relationships. When I start to panic about work, the state of my house, etc. I remind myself that people are more important. And I adjust if I forget.

Exceptional Parents, how do you walk that fine line of balance between yours and your Exceptional Child’s needs successfully. How do you stay calm and patient when they are losing it. If you yell and handle things stressfully, forgive yourself and move on. Learn from your mistakes and use that as a way to teach your child to learn from theirs. You’ll grow together in a place where you are both stronger and closer than ever. Until next time.

 

How Being Direct Can Help Your Exceptional Child

adorable, baby, boy

I was the queen of metaphors with my son Michael, and even now, when I know it is hard for him to understand them, as a writer, it is hard for me to stay away from them. Still, I have learned the hard way over the last three years after recovering from my own burnout, how important it is to be direct with your child who is exceptional. It does not matter how verbal they and how much they understand. They will still get confused, anxious and get overwhelmed which could lead to a meltdown. How can a parent better their chances of their child not escalating? Here are some tips:

  1. Talk in simple language: This means spell out exactly what kind of behavior you expect and what kind of consequences lead to not following that behavior.
  2. Stay calm:This is tricky, but mandatory for grounding the child. If they see you are calm, they will feel calm and organized too.
  3. Decide in advance with your partner on all things child related: Mom and Dad must be on the same page for all our children. For exceptional kids, it is beyond necessary. If they see divergence, it is divide and conquer and man, are they good!
  4. Make sure you are operating at 100% capacity: This is a tricky one, but the way I gauge how I can parent at my best is my patience level. If every little thing gets on my nerves, it is time for a walk, workout, or bath. For you, it can be something else to reset your body. Go for it. As they say, oxygen mask on Mom and Dad first to parent the best they can.

Exceptional Parents, what are some of your success stories in helping your child move towards positive behavior? What didn’t work? As long as we learn from our mistakes, our kids will benefit from it and grow as well. And if you ever need help, don’t hesitate to reach out to your special needs community, virtual or in person. Don’t hesitate to reach out to coach or close friend. You are truly part of a family who will get all the hardship, joy and fulfillment in raising an exceptional child.  Until next time.

SPECIAL OFFER: February is the month of love. We show love to our children, partners and friends But what about to ourselves as parents? Do you know how to practice self-care and truly love the amazing parent and person you are? If you need support in this area of your life, until Feb. 28th I am offering a FREE ONE HOUR one on one coaching session, as well as a second one hour one on one coaching session at 50% off regular price. Give yourself the gift of self-love, and learn some great tools to begin to put your needs first so you can parent in balance. Contact me at joanne@creatingexceptionalparenting.com or 514-827-7175 to book your Skype session. www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com

Tokens and Audio Visual Rewards- Positive Praise Goes A Long Way

business, computer, device

Michael is getting better at handling stress and anxiety. And though he does not always listen for the sake of listening, having a token system with audio visual being at the tail end is really working for us as a family. There are good days and bad, but I can honestly say that if you reinforce your child when they are behaving positively, it will help teach them what they are capable of doing and how good leads to good. It takes some kids longer to learn this than others, but most will learn if there is a consistent system in place.

For us, we have Michael earn 6 tokens for his best reward ever, 1 hour of time mapping out various parts of the city or watching music videos that have been approved by us. For 5 tokens he gets 30 minutes. For less than that, we have other rewards set out. The important thing is that he sees when he is listening we are happy and there to support him.

Exceptional Parents, how do you reward your Exceptional Child when they are listening? Do you catch them being good? If so, that is wonderful. If you forget, don’t despair. All parents and professionals make this mistake from time to time. We get busy, and forget to see the good in people as well as in ourselves. Remember to catch your child being good and make a big deal out of it in the beginning. As their confidence grows, so will they listen more and everything will fall more smoothly into place. Until next time.

I am a writer and parent coach who is passionate about empowering parents to trust their own instinct when raising their exceptional children with autism, and remembering that parenthood is as much a journey for us as childhood is for our children. For more information on my parent coaching programs, and to book a FREE 30 Minute Consultation Session, see my website: http://www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com.

SPECIAL OFFER: February is the month of love. We show love to our children, partners and friends But what about to ourselves as parents? Do you know how to practice self-care and truly love the amazing parent and person you are? If you need support in this area of your life, until Feb. 28th I am offering a FREE ONE HOUR one on one coaching session, as well as a second one hour one on one coaching session at 50% off regular price. Give yourself the gift of self-love, and learn some great tools to begin to put your needs first so you can parent in balance. Contact me at joanne@creatingexceptionalparenting.com or 514-827-7175 to book your Skype session. www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com

How to Handle Anxiety And Sensory Issues in an Older Child

analog, binder, blank

This week has been an interesting week with Michael. Well, pretty much every week is interesting. Some weeks are more challenging than others, good and bad. Last week was a good week overall, but I did notice a lot of anxiety in Michael. The good thing is he is learning to express himself better and talk about his feelings. The bad thing is that the same measures that used to work (offering him sensory massages, pillows to squeeze and showing him his exercise ball) don’t always work. He will sometimes actively fight me on even trying these techniques. This is what I am calling the curse of the tween hormones, with a touch of autism. I add the last part for a little bit of humor to get us through the tougher moments when Michael is pretty arguing with us about everything. This morning it was when he would do his chores so he could accumulate money to buy his next toy. Weekends are tough as the structure changes, and though it has been nice taking a break from extracurricular activities, Dad and I now he needs them again. The brain break was good, but physically for stress relief and sensory reasons we see how he really needs to move.

It’s tough though, as he is at the age when he does not like challenge. Our school physiotherapist warned us that due to a mild hypotonia, he may not like being physically pushed to go a little farther. But in order for him to get strong and build muscle,  he would need to move as this would help him. When he moves, just like any child, he also burns energy, feels more relaxed and positive, and handles stress and sensory issues better. It’s a tough balance, and one I am slowly learning to navigate as the mother of a tween. In all areas, he is growing up, pushing us away in daytime, and then pulling us closer at night. Sundays he dreads going back to school even though he is doing well. It is the pushing of limits. He wants to play it safe, as we are trying to teach him that only by taking risks can he make progress. I find that by giving him some freedom, I am helping him learn his own power. But then I must remind him, these are your strategies to calm down. Let’s write them on a paper. Let’s look at pictures of the equipment. Now you try what works.

Exceptional parents, what sensory issues/anxieties are your experiencing with your Exceptional Child? Are they close to or at the tween age or younger? You will see your child move through cycles, no matter what age they are. There will be good days and bad days. There will be victories and setbacks. The most important thing you can do is remind your child that though there are rules they have to follow with you and adults around them, they also have a measure of control over their life, their anxiety, and their sensory issues. Praise them when they make a good choice. Calmly redirect when they stumble. And if you need a minute, give yourself a time out to breathe and move forward. Only if you are calm and centered, can you help your child move forward into independence as stress-free as possible. Until next time.

I am a writer and parent coach who is passionate about empowering parents to trust their own instinct when raising their exceptional children with autism, and remembering that parenthood is as much a journey for us as childhood is for our children. For more information on my parent coaching programs, and to book a FREE 30 Minute Consultation Session, see my website: http://www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com.

SPECIAL OFFER: February is the month of love. We show love to our children, partners and friends But what about to ourselves as parents? Do you know how to practice self-care and truly love the amazing parent and person you are? If you need support in this area of your life, until Feb. 28th I am offering a FREE ONE HOUR one on one coaching session, as well as a second one hour one on one coaching session at 50% off regular price. Give yourself the gift of self-love, and learn some great tools to begin to put your needs first so you can parent in balance. Contact me at joanne@creatingexceptionalparenting.com or 514-827-7175 to book your Skype session. www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com

 

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Bedtime Separation And Puberty-New Exceptional Issues

So I have been noticing that we now have new problems with Michael at bedtime. He cooperates, to a certain extent with the routine, but then will end up moving at a snail’s pace and slowing down when he needs to keep moving. When I gently and later impatiently remind him that there is no time to finish the rest of his routine, he is shocked. Sometimes we have a little fight, other times he is just bewildered. I see we need to get started earlier and earlier until he learns how to tell time and what to expect when he goes slow. I also am wondering if the stalling and slowing down is due to his dislike of the nighttime and sleep. Separating has always been hard. He was so upset the other night when I told him I not only could not do massage, but I could not lie down with him due to the lateness of the hour. I am slowly seeing what changes we need to make in the bedtime routine.

I have decided I will be giving Michael a little more choice in what he includes in his routine, and also that he must do this in a reasonable time. He is pushing me away a bit now with the onset of puberty by openly saying he does not want to tell me certain things about his day, yet then at night there is this desire for me to put him to bed, lie down with him, not Dad. I think it is the push/pull of maturity and the fear of loss. He will also say, “tonight is our baking night. You are not working.” He is happy and wants to spend time with me, yet then hugs and kisses are restricted. So typical, yet there is an autism twist to it. “You can kiss me on this cheek, not that one.” He likes us to call him by his full name now only, not a nickname. Before it was only everyone else, now Mom and Dad too. All these rules and pulling away means he is growing up. New ways of handling this stage are being developed, and I am glad that now that we have a behavior management plan in place, I can see where he is truly struggling , where he is testing, and where he is hurting. I know more how to help now.

Exceptional Parents, are your Exceptional Children doing the push/pull/back again thing? Are they at that stage? Maybe they are just clingy all the time and driving you crazy. Remember, there is always a reason for their behavior. They are trying to figure things out in the world. Stay calm and patient as you learn to read their signals, and remember, you and they will grow stronger together as a result. Until next time.

SPECIAL OFFER: February is the month of love. We show love to our children, partners and friends But what about to ourselves as parents? Do you know how to practice self-care and truly love the amazing parent and person you are? If you need support in this area of your life, until Feb. 28th I am offering a FREE ONE HOUR one on one coaching session, as well as a second one hour one on one coaching session at 50% off regular price. Give yourself the gift of self-love, and learn some great tools to begin to put your needs first so you can parent in balance. Contact me at joanne@creatingexceptionalparenting.com or 514-827-7175 to book your Skype session. www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com

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Navigating Social Interactions And Helping Exceptional Children Handle Rigidity

Over the weekend I took Michael to a local winter carnival. It was overall a success, but there were some moments, where Michael as usual, through me some curve balls as far as behavior and comprehension was concerned. Some of it was vintage Michael.  What I mean was that with some of it  I am truly seeing is part of his particularly quirky character and how he approaches people. This is both part of his very social and friendly self where he asks everyone their name and introduces himself, and where I see the traits that are part of his autism side, the side that has a hard time reading other people’s facial expressions and looking for cues in the environment to know what is going to happen. He also talks loudly, which I know is part of his family background, (we all talk loudly in our family), and but it is also sensory and due to anxiety. As a parent, I walk the line of trying to teach Michael to balance these two sides of his personality as he is getting older. It is not always easy.  Then I have the task of disciplining him when he says, “I can’t help it. I have autism.” I almost laughed and cried the first time I heard him say it. It is impressive and frustrating that he would say that to try and get away with bad behavior. He is learning now though, that there are limits and how to navigate them.

I am seeing a lot of control issues though lately around perceived mistakes that he makes and others make. He cannot tolerate these. The swearing he does is when we do things he does not like, to his father, I or another adult making mistakes. With other adults, he does not swear out loud though, which is a good thing. In his view, these are when things are not done or said perfectly. I feel so bad for him that he has to see the world so black and white, yet frustrated for myself that it is hard to break into that and show him flexibility. I imagine all that extra stress he carries around with him due to these self-imposed demands. Only call me this name, repeat the phrase like this etc. I know this is his way as it is for a lot of people with autism, to control a world that is uncontrollable and moving at a speed that is often too fast and complicated for him and his nervous system. I sometimes stop in the course of my day and see what a crazy fast-paced world we live in where things happen in seconds and you have to cope, act, react appropriately. Information comes at all of us constantly. Demands are placed on all of us to perform faster in our jobs yet with more accuracy. There is so much to do, so little time. We feel bad when we take “time off” which is not really off.  Our electronic devices are with us and/or we are thinking about what we need to do next.

Rear View of Boy Sitting at Home

Unplugging is something I am starting to do more of in 2017, and want to slowly introduce my family to. A lot of friends are starting to do this, friends with neuro typical kids. People sense the difference in mindset. This goes beyond daily meditation and yoga and weekly exercise. These things are hugely helpful in staying mindful and present-centered. That is the place from which we make the best decisions. But every once in a while a total mental health break is important too. Detach and head off into nature, curl up with a book, play a board game with family. Stay in the moment and learn how to relax and unwind again. This is mandatory for our Exceptional Children and for us as parents to recharge our batteries and be able to model good problems solving skills and a happier and more balanced life. We will also be able to help our children more when we ourselves are relaxed.

Exceptional Parents, how do you unplug and stay more in the moment? What are some tricks you’ve learned to show your kids? Whether they have autism or not, these are challenging times for our children. They need our help to find ways to relax, stay on task, and read the world around them. Kids with autism have it harder for sure, but it is never impossible. Start with small steps by modeling your own problem solving skills and how you get out in nature to unplug. Soon they will be able to follow suit and learn ways to handle stress better. Until next time.

SPECIAL OFFER: February is the month of love. We show love to our children, partners and friends But what about to ourselves as parents? Do you know how to practice self-care and truly love the amazing parent and person you are? If you need support in this area of your life, until Feb. 28th I am offering a FREE ONE HOUR one on one coaching session, as well as a second one hour one on one coaching session at 50% off regular price. Give yourself the gift of self-love, and learn some great tools to begin to put your needs first so you can parent in balance. Contact me at joanne@creatingexceptionalparenting.com or 514-827-7175 to book your Skype session. www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com

 

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Valentine’s Day As A Way to Teach Love and Empathy to Exceptional Kids

This is a fun day for a lot of kids. Valentine’s Day means chocolates, candies, cards and treats. But for exceptional kids sometimes the comprehension of why we celebrate this day goes over their heads. As with many other tools, using Valentine’s Day as a tool to help kids with autism understand love, compassion and empathy can be used. Here are a few ways to make it fun:

  1. Help them fill out cards for friends or make their own: This is a great way to practice fine motor skills and get creative. It can also help smooth the way to making new friends which so difficult for our kids.
  2. Try new foods, even sugary ones IN SMALL quantities: This can help kids learn to try new foods and textures, even some sugary snacks. But who says it has to be junk food. Carrot sticks, red peppers or other red foods can make it fun.
  3. Invite a friend for a play date: This is a way of showing love and compassion and a great way to start teaching it is on Valentine’s Day.
  4. Have them help you decorate the house: Decorating the house with pictures, crafts is like a visual to help kids understand what the holiday means or could mean. Depending on your child’s comprehension level, you can talk about what Valentines means.
  5. Exchange small gifts with family members: Have a gift exchange or card exchange with other members of the family. This is a great visual to show your child what the day means.

Exceptional Parents, how do you celebrate Valentine’s Day with your Exceptional Child? How do you make it special without it becoming overwhelming and resulting in a meltdown? I’d love to hear from you. The important thing is to always use occasions as teaching opportunities. You’ll be surprised how much your child will teach you as you will teach them. Here’s wishing you and your family a Happy Valentine’s Day.  Until next time.

SPECIAL OFFER: February is the month of love. We show love to our children, partners and friends But what about to ourselves as parents? Do you know how to practice self-care and truly love the amazing parent and person you are? If you need support in this area of your life, until Feb. 28th I am offering a FREE ONE HOUR one on one coaching session, as well as a second one hour one on one coaching session at 50% off regular price. Give yourself the gift of self-love, and learn some great tools to begin to put your needs first so you can parent in balance. Contact me at joanne@creatingexceptionalparenting.com or 514-827-7175 to book your Skype session. www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com.

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5 Ways To Build Self-Esteem in Our Exceptional Children And Ourselves As Parents

Lately I have been a little disturbed by what Michael has been saying. While he has been challenging at times not making the best behavior choices, I have been hearing the words after we reprimand him gently;

“I know I’m not a good boy. I’m a bad boy.”

I don’t know where he is getting this language. I know at school they focus on the behavior, not the child. At home it is the same thing. Still, I hear the echoes of low self-esteem in the background. It is the echo from my own childhood where I never thought I was good enough or worthy. I still don’t know where those feelings came from. It took me almost thirty years to truly learn to love myself as I am today, flaws and all, even with the whole world telling me I was good and kind and decent. As a parent and one of an exceptional child who has extremely high anxiety, my heart breaks for him. All Dad and I can do is continue to correct his language. “You made a bad choice. You are a good boy.” My parents did not use this language with me, not because they did not show me they loved me in other ways. They did not know the words to use. I learned them at an older age.

It is so important we teach our kids self-love. This is not from the “I’m amazing and need to win at everything and never fail or else I can complain about it” school of thought we sometimes see in our world today. Some people mistakenly think kids are not allowed to be told what to do. It is the end of the world if they get a bad grade etc. No, these all build character and resilience in children. What we need to teach is self-love and accepting yourself for who you are completely, warts and all. Especially with children who have autism and other challenges, they need to know and be taught how to value themselves in a harshly competitive world that may not know how to teach them. Here are some ways I am working with Michael to teach him self-love:

  1. Teach the language of self-love: First, we need to show them the language to use. “I  made a bad choice. It is ok. I will learn from it.” NOT “I am bad.”
  2. Model positive self-talk ourselves: When our children hear us being gentle with ourselves, they will learn to do the same. If you make a mistake, cut yourself some slack. You can even make a joke if it is something small.
  3. Catch the good moments: How many of us only comment on the bad, parents, teachers, kids themselves? It is human nature. Catch them doing good things. Praise those things, not over the top. Just a “good job. I’m proud of you,” will do. Think how you feel to be appreciated.
  4. Let them choose tasks which they like: Every day at home or school, kids need to do tasks which they enjoy and are good at. This will balance out the challenging ones, and as much as possible, finding some way they can personalize these tasks can help too.
  5. Teach them how to give back and help others: Empathy is so important and is a hard skill to teach to children who have a hard time relating to other people due to how they are wired. Find ways to build in helping others, from giving to charity, volunteering time, including a lonely friend at school into games.

Exceptional Parents, what have you tried to help your Exceptional Child learn to love themselves and the world more? It’s not easy raising children. They make us ask the hard questions, and unless we are letting them raise us and our awareness at the same time, we will run into problems. Always go with the particular flow of your child. You know them best. And don’t be afraid to try new things to help them see how special they are. We all have something to contribute to the world. Until next time.

SPECIAL OFFER: February is the month of love. We show love to our children, partners and friends But what about to ourselves as parents? Do you know how to practice self-care and truly love the amazing parent and person you are? If you need support in this area of your life, until Feb. 28th I am offering a FREE ONE HOUR one on one coaching session, as well as a second one hour one on one coaching session at 50% off regular price. Give yourself the gift of self-love, and learn some great tools to begin to put your needs first so you can parent in balance. Contact me at joanne@exceptionalparenting.com or 514-827-17175 to book your Skype session

Are you looking to make changes in your special needs parenting life? Do you need support on your journey?  I am a writer and parent coach who is passionate about empowering parents to trust their own instinct when raising their exceptional children with autism, and remembering that parenthood is as much a journey for us as childhood is for our children. For more information on my parent coaching programs, and to book a FREE 30 Minute Consultation Session, see my website: http://www.creatingexceptionalparenting.com.